Finger Lakes Grape Program Enrollment

Program Areas

  • Pest Management
  • Vineyard Nutrition
  • Crop Management
  • Market Development
  • Farm Business

Enrollment Benefits

  • Vineyard Consultations
  • Finger Lakes Vineyard Update
  • Semi-monthly Finger Lakes Vineyard Notes
  • Educational Meetings & Conferences
  • Discounted Conference Registration Fees

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FALL   •   WINTER   •   SPRING   •   SUMMER          New Vineyard Timeline
Grape - Spring Content

B.E.V. NY   •   BUSINESS MANAGEMENT   •   CULTURAL PRACTICES   •   IPM   •   VINE NUTRITION AND SOILS


1-year Pre-plant · Assessment of Site Needs

Once a site has been selected, several important tasks must be completed to cover as many details as possible before vines actually go into the ground. This is one attempt to avoid any surprises after site preparation and vine planting and before any major resources are used.

Contact planting contractor

Laser planting? Auger and a tractor? Shovel and a strong back? Regardless of planting strategy, be prepared for the planting date. Whether you are hiring someone to plant, or you have volunteers to help, try to schedule a planting date one year ahead of time. You may find that one year is not enough time to schedule busy contractors for planting your vineyard, so be sure to contact them as soon as the varieties have been selected.

Assess deer and other animal pressure

If you are not prepared for deer and other animal pressure, surviving winter temperatures and spring frosts will amount to little, as deer can eat vines down to the ground. Deer fencing in high-pressure areas may be necessary, or there are various chemical deer deterrents that have not been tested in research trials. For other animal pressure, grow tubes might reduce feeding, but electric fences are often deployed around small acreages.

Determine and address irrigation and drainage needs

During site preparation (link to site preparation), irrigation or drainage needs should have been addressed. Remember, it is best to prepare the site as much as possible (irrigation, drainage, nutrient management, weed removal) prior to putting plants in the ground because each of these tasks becomes more difficult when maneuvering around vines and trellis hardware.

Resources

Wolf, T. et.al. 2008. Wine Grape Production Guide for Eastern North America. Cooperative Extension NRAES:145.


Content by:

Dr. Jodi Creasap Gee
Viticulture Extension Educator
Lake Erie Regional Grape Program


calendar of events

Upcoming Events

Tailgate Meeting

Event Offers DEC Credits

April 30, 2019
4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Geneva, NY

Our first tailgate meeting of 2019 will take place at Three Brothers Wineries and Estates on Seneca Lake.
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2019 Finger Lakes Spring Grape IPM Meeting

Event Offers DEC Credits

May 15, 2019
4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Hammondsport, NY

Come hear updates on weed and disease management, spotted lanternfly, managing fruit fly populations for sour rot, and more. Be sure to stay and enjoy dinner and social time with your fellow growers afterwards.

This year's meeting will be held at the Doyle Vineyard Management farm in Hammondsport, NY on Wednesday, May 15, 2019 from 4:30 - 6:00 PM. Dinner will be provided, so registration is required. There is no charge for 2019 FLGP enrollees.
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Announcements

Katie Gold Named New Grape Pathologist

Katie Gold has been named as the new assistant professor of Grape Disease Ecology and Epidemiology at Cornell AgriTech in Geneva. Katie is currently completing her Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Upon completion of her Ph.D., she will conduct postdoctoral research at the NASA Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) in California from August 2019 through January 2020. While at JPL, Katie will gain experience with the latest hardware and software for remote imaging with future application to digital agriculture and grape production. She will begin her tenure-track assistant professor position on February 1, 2020 with responsibilities that are 60% research and 40% extension.

Her research and extension seminars were on the topics of "Hyperspectral systems for pre-symptomatic potato disease detection" and "Agricultural sensors in Grape IPM", highlighting some of the tools and approaches that she will bring to the position. Katie is already setting up collaborations for her grape work in New York and plans to attend the American Society for Enology and Viticulture - Eastern Section Meeting in Geneva this July.


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